The MetMUnch Vegan Foodie 2 by Nikita Star

Festivals & Fairs!

Before I begin introducing Manchester restaurants, let me start with a quick intro to vegan foodie festivals and fairs! These are happening more and more regularly within the Manchester food scene. Search for them on social media to keep up to date and make sure to go hungry and prepare to be stuffed with a range of taste-tastic creations. Vegan or carnivore, you will not be disappointed.

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VON (Vegan Organic Network) Festivals and Fairs

http://veganorganic.net

Von is a UK registered charity aiming to promote and support organic vegan agriculture.

These snaps were taken from their event in November 2017. VON is great for vegan feasting and hold multiple events throughout the year. Look forward to free mini samples on offer and sometimes a goodie bag on entry.

As well as incredible food, there are clothing and beauty stalls, live music, and various talks and workshops. For future events, check out their Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/VeganOrganicNetwork/events/

Honestly, you would never believe the cakes below were vegan.

Nikita Cakes

 

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GRUB – Plant Powered Sundays http://www.grubmcr.com/

Fairfield Social Club, Archway 6, Temperance Street,  M12 6HR

Ok, so this becoming so popular and I can’t wait to go back. I can see this place being my new favourite spot for vegan grub. GRUB is a street food events company and holds events every weekend, but Sundays are dedicated to the plant eaters. They have 4 or 5 street food stalls, and they are exceptional and change weekly.

The setting has a hipster vibe full of soul, fairy lights and music. There’s a bar serving vegan alcohol and it’s the place to be on a Sunday. Follow them on twitter as they’re always doing competitions for free food and drinks at their events. Though they’re open all day and try to stack enough grub, get there early, you don’t want to risk missing out.

Nikita Chippy

I was lucky enough to attend when “The Hip Hop Chip Shop” were there (see above). Oh my, a vegan chippy. It was FAB. Very impressed with their battered soy shrimp and the chunky chips were the best chippy chips I’ve ever had, for real.

I had treats from ChouChoux, and Bake-O-Rama’s cupcakes were superb. All washed down with a refreshing pint of vegan cider.

Let’s face it, Sundays are a day of rest, so rather than cook yourself, go and enjoy the best vegan street grub Manchester has to offer.

Nikita Cakes 2

 

COMING UP:

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Northern Vegan Festival. https://www.northernveganfestival.com/
When: Saturday 7th April, 10:30am – 5pm

Where: Manchester central, Windmill Street, M2 3GX

I love this one. I missed last year but I did go the previous year. I find it similar to the VON festival. Its big and rammed with food, beauty and clothes stalls. There’s workshops, demos, talks, live music and sometimes speed dating! At the end of the day it spills over to a night of socialising at The Thirsty Scholar- a lively pub down the road from Man Met Uni, serving vegan alcohol. The event is volunteer run and all ticket money goes to animal welfare charities.
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Vegan Life Live http://www.veggies.org.uk/event/vegan-life-live-manchester/

When: Friday 20th April – Sunday 22nd April
Where: Event City, M14 7TB

This is a new 3-day event brought to us by Vegan Life Magazine. A bus ride away for us Manchester students, its located in Trafford. It sounds as though it will be worth the journey, promising delicious food and drink, clothing, cosmetics and education.

Get in touch with us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and let us know what you think! 

 

The MetMUnch Vegan Foodie By Nikita Star

Being Vegan in Manchester

I’m Nikita and I’m a second year Nutritional Sciences student at Manchester Met. Yes, my love for food is so real, that I’m studying it!

Since being a baby, my mum tells me stories of my excessive sweet tooth, and not much has changed, well except I transitioned to a vegan diet in 2013. To be honest, this only grew my passion for food. At the time, veganism was no way near as big as it is now and so it forced me to learn how to cook. Fast forward a few years and eating out or ordering a vegan takeaway has never been easier.

The vegan movement continuous to grow and Britain alone has seen a 360% increase in Vegans over the last 10 years (Quinn, 2016), with figures of over half a million Brits being vegan (The Vegan Society, n.d.). Furthermore, in 2017, statistics revealed 28% of Brits reduced their meat intake within 6 months and 49% are interested in doing so (Mintel, 2017) for ethical and health reasons. Meat alternatives are on the incline with 50% of Brits purchasing meat-free products (Mintel, 2017) and this year a whopping 168,500 people signed up for the Veganuary pledge for reasons including animal welfare, health and the environment (Veganuary, 2018).
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Figure 1: Veganuary (2018) Statistics

Manchester is the place to be for vegan grub, with more vegan options appearing on menus and new vegan restaurants popping up all over the city. This isn’t surprising, Manchester has always been ahead of the game being the birthplace of the Vegetarian Society.

So, I dedicate this blog series to all the delicious vegan food Manchester has to offer. I would like to point out some of my photos are of mediocre quality; I had no idea I would end up sharing my food adventures. If you’re new to Manchester, new to Veganism, or just want to increase your palette, stay tuned to find out where is good to get Manchester vegan grub.

References

Mintel (2017) 28% of Brits have cut back their meat consumption over the last six months. Mintel. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018] http://www.mintel.com/press-centre/food-and-drink/28-of-brits-have-cut-back-their-meat-consumption-over-the-last-six-months.

Quinn, S. (2016) Number of vegans in Britain rises by 360% in 10 years. The Telegraph. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018] http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/news/number-of-vegans-in-britain-rises-by-360-in-10-years/.

The Vegan Society (n.d.) Key facts. The Vegan Society. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018] https://www.vegansociety.com/about-us/further-information/key-facts.

Veganuary (2018) A Record-Breaking Veganuary 2018. Veganuary.com. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018] https://veganuary.com/blog/a-record-breaking-veganuary-2018/.

This Is How We Stew It – Lindsay Seccombe

There I stand staring into my cupboards, dreaming of having some money so that could eat out tonight when I think to myself, you’re a nutrition student, you’re supposed to cook tasty, healthy meals.

Now what can I make!? I look to my right and there I see my trusty companion, my slow cooker.

If you don’t have a slow cooker already, then I advise you to buy one. As a university student cooking for yourself, you will only need a small 1.5 litre one for as little as £7! – Absolutely Stewpendous (I seriously love puns…)

I enjoy cooking many meals in my slow cooker, as I can throw all my ingredients into the pot and carry on with my day rather than standing over a hot stove. Because to be honest… I don’t have time for that!

This recipe can be altered in spiciness depending on how daring your taste buds are, personally I prefer mine fairly mild. I suppose this recipe is a mix between a curry and a stew, due to the spice involved.

So here we go…

Ingredients (Serves 2 – Costs £0.44p per serving) – wow!

  • 1 Tin Chopped Tomatoes
  • 1 Tin Mixed Beans in Chilli Sauce
  • 1 tsp Medium Curry Powder
  • 1 tsp Mixed Herbs
  • 50g Lentils

(Optional extras include – peppers, onions, chickpeas or whatever else needs using up in your cupboards) – which would change the cost slightly.

So, as I said earlier, there isn’t much method involved as all ingredients can be added straight to the slow cooker except for the lentils.

The lentils need to be added to 250ml water and cooked in a pan on the hob for 25 minutes before being added to the slow cooker. Leave the slow cooker to do its job on a ‘high’ heat setting for 4 hours, stirring occasionally.

The stew can be served on its own or with a hefty scoop of rice or potatoes!

Serve and ENJOY!

Check out MetMUnch for more savvy student tips over at metmunch.com, on Instagram and Twitter at @metmunch.

Gluten: Friend or Foe? – by Molly Hanson

The gluten-free diet: Possibly the biggest diet trend of the 21st century, there are copious amounts of gluten free products available to purchase these days making it accessible to all. For those that cannot tolerate gluten, this accessibility means that their social life and eating habits are less impeded than ever before and preparation for a meal out is rarely necessary.

But is going gluten free beneficial for everyone?

When the gluten-free diet is necessary:

Gluten, which is a storage protein found in wheat, barley and rye, can have a dangerous effect on certain individuals.

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For those with coeliac disease as little bit of gluten can have irreversible effects. The consumption of gluten triggers an immune response which damages the lining of the small intestine causing the microvilli (finger-like projections) to be damaged and become flat, which inhibits absorption of nutrients, and can result in malabsorption.

This response causes the symptoms associated with Coeliac Disease such as excessive wind, change in stool frequency and consistency, stomach pain and bloating. In serious un-treated cases coeliacs can develop villious atrophy where the microvilli totally disappear. These symptoms increase the risk for other health conditions such as anaemia and osteoporosis due to insufficient Iron and/or Calcium absorption. In this case a strict gluten-free diet is necessary and will improve the health of the individual dramatically.

There is also a condition that causes similar symptoms; non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. However, the consumption of gluten does not result in an auto-immune response and there is no intestinal damage. Having said that the symptoms can be as painful and debilitating as those with coeliac disease suffer and a gluten free diet can also be necessary to improve health.

When the gluten-free diet is used incorrectly:

Following the gluten free diet with no gluten related health condition? Perhaps a friend suggested going gluten free because ‘it’s better for you’, or perhaps you read an article online or in the newspaper based on anecdotal reports, suggesting that the gluten free diet can help you to; lose weight, boost energy, treat autism or generally feel healthier.

pointing-finger-1922074_1280Following the diet erroneously can result in more harm than good. A recent study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) suggested that the omission of gluten may result in reduced consumption of a variety of beneficial wholegrains, which may affect cardiovascular health. In conclusion the promotion of a gluten-free diet among people without coeliac disease (or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity) should not be encouraged.

If you think you are suffering with either of the two conditions above, do not cut gluten out of your diet without Medical advice and make an appointment with your GP as soon as possible.

For more advice, visit Coeliac UK at https://www.coeliac.org.uk/home/.

MUM vs MMU – Emma Green

Big Changes to food and dietary habits

There’s many big changes that come into play when starting university: living in a different city, new groups of friends, but one change we don’t really think about is our food and dietary habits. And surprisingly, it can have a HUGE effect on our student lives.

My Mum, as most Mum’s do, played a huge part in encouraging my love of food whilst growing up. She taught me how to cook from a young age and introduced me to different world cuisines, as well as providing me with the facilities to learn to cook in. I’m very fortunate to have been given these skills as a tot, but I know many students cannot cook or simply, find cooking a chore.

Losing the help of Mum when you’re at University can lead to malnutrition, through poor dietary habits and a lack of nutrients. In 2016, a study found that 1/3 couldn’t even boil an egg, with 48% being unable to put together a simply spaghetti Bolognese.

Putting together a simple meal is super easy!!

There are many student friendly recipe books, YouTube tutorials and even on-the-go apps to teach you some tips (and some here at MetMUnch, of course 😃).

I grew up very much in a meat and two veg family, which I often found laborious and repetitive. Independence with my food choice allowed me to find my own rhythm with my food preferences. Since starting at Manchester Met, I make sure I go meat free at least 2 or 3 days a week. Increasing your veggie uptake can not only be great for your health, but is a sustainable way of living.

Live Sustainably

Living sustainably is probably something you hadn’t even considered since becoming a student,  and not surprisingly, students are the worst at it. With over buying, over cooking and serial snacking, we throw away a huge seven billion tonnes of food away each year, much of which can be eaten.

For students, wasting food is also a huge waste of money, but by following a few simple tips, you could save a lot of pennies in your pockets.

Remember, the freezer is your friend, where keeping fresh fruit and veg, alongside meat, bread and leftover meals will reduce any waste without compromising on taste and nutrient contents (be sure NOT to reheat cooked meat though, keep that in the fridge to eat cold). Communal cooks are also great if you have some friends who want to share some meals and split up the cooking tasks (and the washing up).

As a nutrition student, I thought that I would have cooking healthy for one MASTERED, but surprisingly, my diet took a big hit. I gained independence with my choice of foods and allowed myself to try new foods, but this was also as bad as it was good. The availability of fast food was hard to resist, and slowly tempted me in after nights out, for lazy lunches and when I run out of food and simply could not be bothered to shop.

It made me CRAVE the home cooking and nutrient rich roasts made by my Mum. I’ve slowly learnt to curb these cravings and health up my habits (but no, I still haven’t mastered the singular measure of pasta either).

To help me get back from takeaway binges, I now check out MetMUnch for some savvy student tips over on Instagram and Twitter, you should too!

How to cure a hangover (theoretically) – By Emma Green

Here at MetMUnch, we don’t encourage drinking to the excess, but we know that sometimes we can have a few too many vodka lemonades on a night out, which can lead to a bit of a sore head the next day. That’s right, the dreaded hangover.

So, what do you really know about the nutritional status of alcohol?

Well here’s a few facts:

  • There are 7kcals in every gram of alcohol. That’s almost as much as fat (9kcal/g)! These calories are also referred to as empty calories, as they contain little nutritional value, so aren’t contributing any health benefits to our bodies. These calories soon mount up, especially when consuming numerous drinks on a night out.
  • It’s not just the alcohol itself, but what you consume with it. Mixers are full of sugar and additives, with a 330ml can of coca cola containing 139kcals and 39% of your daily sugar intake. From one can! Ciders and wines are also full of extra sugars, which can pile on the pounds. And all those calories are before that fatty, end of the night takeaway!
  • Over consumption of alcohol can lead to metabolic issues, liver problems and obesity. This can ultimately lead to a poor quality of life as you age.
  • Alcohol is both a stimulant and a depressant. Alcohol affects our brain chemistry, influencing our thoughts, feelings and actions. For many, it can provide a temporary confidence boost and reduce anxiety, but excessive drinking increases the chances of negative emotional responses. This could not only turn a super night sour, but in the long term have a huge effect on your mental health.

our bodies

Our bodies are designed to process small amounts of alcohol. Alcohol (ethanol) converts to a substance called acetaldehyde, which converts to a product called acetate. The body can use this for energy. However, excess consumption of alcohol causes a build-up of acetaldehyde, which causes a whole load of nasties, such as mistakes in our DNA and free radicals.

You’ve probably heard of many horror stories about free radicals. They are highly unstable atoms which cause damage to our cells and tissues – they can be stabilised by antioxidants, which we can get from consuming plenty of vitamins and minerals in our diets.

So, theoretically, eating loads of fruits and veggies can combat excess alcohol consumption and that nasty hangover, right!? Sadly for us, getting rid of a hangover isn’t that simple, but there’s a few tips that can keep it at bay (or just make it a little less painful).

tips

  • Make every other drink a water! By keeping hydrated, you will pace out and reduce your alcohol consumption, whilst still having a great time out. And you will thank yourself in the morning when you feel as fresh as a daisy!
  • Eat plenty of fruits and veggies before, during and after the night out will keep you topped up with antioxidants to (try and) combat the hangover. Reaching for fatty, sugary convenience foods will contribute to weight gain, and make you feel sluggish and fatigued the next day.
  • When choosing drinks, opt for lighter, sugar free versions! This will save massive amounts of calories and sugar, but also reduce fatigue and the chance of feeling a bit rotten after all the fun.
  • Keep moving! A good boogie the night before surprisingly will contribute to your activity and fitness, but make sure you move about the next day to keep you feeling revived, as well as sweating out some of those sins. Too many of us spend hangover days bed ridden, which is so bad for your health and productivity.

But we’re not saying quit the drink completely! Of course, we all need to let our hair down and have a bit of fun. Drinking in moderation is completely okay, alongside making healthier choices and staying in control when going out. So, go out, have fun, and keep that hangover at bay.

Check out the calories in your drink at https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/understand-your-drinking/unit-calculator

Check out MetMUnch on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for more food, health and sustainability inspiration!

Salad season is here – Cennet Tezgel

It’s time to ditch the soups, salad season is upon us and what a perfect way to get in your 5 a day. The thought of salads may seem boring to you though right?

That’s where we go wrong, salads can still be delicious and energising foods without being associated to being on a “diet”. We can spice up our salad, add different vegetables and even add fruit to be adventurous and exotic.

Why eat salads on a nutrition point of view? Vegetables in salads have a good source of insoluble fibre which will help keep a healthy digestive tract, adding extra sources of fibre such as nuts, seeds and beans to our salads known as soluble fibre can help to keep out blood sugar levels balanced along side a healthy living diet and lifestyle.

Salad vegetables such as spinach, a dark vibrant colour adds in the nutritional profile packed with vitamin A & C, as well as adding in iron and fibre.

Tomatoes a popular salad ingredient adds vitamin C and fibre. Fibre aids in achieving a healthy weight, as well as keeping a healthy digestive system, with vitamin C is a treatment for the common cold, boosts the immune system as well maintaining a healthy skin, and healing of skin which may be vital during the hot summer days.

But why not be adventurous instead of the normal day to day salads? I have a few recipes to share to get your salads looking instagramable, summer vibrant and full of colour that will make your food choices this summer extra healthy and happy.

Here are my top four favourite ingredients/recipes for a salad this summer, if you decide to be adventurous try them out and tag a picture in Instagram with @metmunch we love to see your food pictures.

  1. Roasted Aubergines

An easy vegetarian recipe, that can pack your salad with summer flavours. Aubergines are a source of dietary fibre, B1 & B6 and also adding in as a source of potassium.

  1. Mint

A perfect additional to a bit of flavour to your salads, a perfect summer taste. A good idea is courgette, feta and mint salad. or you can add to your basic salad vegetables with a apple cider vinegar and olive oil dressing. Mint is perfect to grow in your own garden, much sustainable and organic, additionally on a health side mint is known to be promote digestion, and good for individuals with irritable bowel syndrome to relieve symptoms.

  1. Pomegranate

There’s nothing wrong with adding fruit to our salads, it gives it that refreshing taste whilst adding extra vitamins, nutrients and increasing our 5-a-day recommendation. With its sweetness and pleasantly bitter taste it gives it that fresh feeling, along with a superior visual presentation to our salads by adding colour and shine. Pomegranates are known to have anti-inflammatory effects and is a source of antioxidants. A great recipe to try is a goat’s cheese salads with a pomegranate dressing. The dressing is simple to make, with using the juice and seeds of one large pomegranate, 4tbsp of extra virgin olive oil, 1.5tbsp of red wine vinegar, 1tsp of honey, and a touch of salt and pepper to finish. Exotic and beautifully flavoured.

  1. Asparagus

Last but of course not least we have asparagus a perfect addition to your summer salads. Not only are they delicious but very healthy, with only 20 calories per 100 grams and 0g of saturated fats it is one top a nutritionists list for ‘superfoods’. Asparagus has good sources of fibre, folate and vitamins A, C, E and extremely high in vitamin K; Vitamin K is important for strong bones and blood clotting, additionally antioxidants to help repair from free radicals in our body. Know you know that not only asparagus is the food to get a good amount of vitamins from a recipe that I would recommend is asparagus & halloumi salad (or tofu for a substitute).

A simple recipe that just requires asparagus, halloumi, fennel, red onion, and virgin olive oil to finish. After cooking the asparagus until tender, add it to cold water to refresh before adding into your salad, the fennel and onion should be trimmed and finely sliced and combined with the cooked halloumi and asparagus before adding in oil with a squeeze of oranges juice for the finish.

I hope you like the sound of a few of these recipes or added ingredients for your summer salads, don’t forget to tag in @metmunch to show us your creations of the recipes or any new recommendations for us to take on board. Thank you for reading.

 

Don’t waste food, preserve it!

Ok, so issues regarding food waste aren’t exactly brand new information for most people in the UK, especially since research published by the Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) found that the UK created around 10 million tonnes of waste food in 2016, a staggering 60% of which could have been avoided. This has an estimated value of over £17 billion a year, and is associated with around 20 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

Food waste

However, here at MetMUnch, we have been having some thoughts…

Now, this is a little old school, but when a food is nearing the end of shelf life it can still be really useful, so how about making it into something else?

Strawberries a little mushy? Make them into a jam.

Got more cabbage than you can eat? Give kimchi a go.

Whatever you do, DON’T THROW IT!!

What started as a way of keeping food from the bountiful autumn harvest through cold winters is still a good way to keep food, as well as being able to imbue it with all manner of tasty flavours and textures.

But this is just the start…canning, drying, salting and preserving– all this and more is open in the wonderful world of fermented foods!

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The science of preserving

They say the making of food is half-art and half-science. Well, the science is certainly clear to see whenever we preserve our foods.

There are so many methods open to us to keep our food at its best, and all which work on a few basic scientific mechanisms. Here are some examples:

  • Salting – By using salt to draw out the water we dehydrate the food and make it inhospitable to microbes, which would either spoil it or hurt us. Examples of salting include Sauerkraut or salt cod.
  • Vinegar – On a similar theme we can add vinegar, which changes the pH (<4.6), making it too acidic for microbes to grow. Examples include traditional favourites like a pickled onion or egg.
  • Use of ‘good bacteria’ – Competition is a good thing, so if we can get a harmless strain of microbe to proliferate & consume the resources in a food it leaves no room for the ‘bad bacteria’. This tool is often used in conjunction with salting, for example in the traditional Korean dish kimchi, which uses lactic acid bacteria.
  • Anti-microbial agents – It sounds a bit technical but some foods like spices contain natural chemicals that discourage microbial growth. While these are not often enough on their own they provide a great back-up line of defence when combined with one of the other methods. Cinnamon, clove and mustard all have this property.

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These are just a few of the methods of preserving which have an incredible number of variations and combinations to add flavour, texture and safety to our foods. The less you waste food, the more money you will save too! Have a go at home!

Check out MetMUnch on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for more food, health and sustainability inspiration!

Fabulous Foods to Kick Start your Day – Lindsay Seccombe

 Lindsay

MetMUncher Lindsay Seccombe provides us with some excellent hints and tips about energy boosting breakfast ideas…

As a University Student, choosing the right foods for breakfast is key! It really is the most important meal of the day, it fuels your brain with essential nutrients and energy it needs to help you through a day of lectures. It also satisfies the appetite, helping you to avoid overeating during the day, keeping your fingers off those chocolate bars.

Here are a few of my energy-boosting breakfast ideas:

  • Peanut Butter and Banana on Toast

We don’t really need a recipe for this one, but it is full of protein and potassium. A great combination which will give you all the nutrients and energy you need on a morning. This filling combo should help to avoid 10am snacking and satisfy your tummy until lunch time.

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  • Avocado and Poached Egg on Toast

So so yummy, providing you with essential healthy fats, protein and carbs from the moment you wake up. Start as you mean to go on!

  1. Slice the Avocado in half and remove the pip. Scoop out the filling into a bowl and mash together with a dash of salt and pepper.
  2. Bring a pan on cold water to the boil and add a dash of vinegar. Poach the Egg in by gently adding to boiling water and allow to poach for around 3 minutes.
  3. Spread the Avocado onto the Toast and finish by placing the Poached Egg on top.

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  • Fruit Salad sprinkled with Quinoa

Your choice of fruit from berries to bananas, slice and chop then sprinkle with a handful of Quinoa for extra energy and fullness to stop your belly from rumbling. Quinoa is an ingredient many of us are unsure of, however this complete protein has other health benefits such as being high in calcium, magnesium several B vitamins and vitamin E. What more could you want on a Monday morning?

If you’re veggie or vegan try adding more quinoa to your diet, as it contains all nine essential amino acid, helping you to meet your recommended daily intake of protein.

 

quinoa

  • Avocado with Egg and Cheese

Another tasty avocado dish containing healthy fats and protein, scoop and eat the contents with a spoon and you’re good to go.

  1. Slice the Avocado in half and remove the pip.
  2. Crack half an egg into each half of the Avocado (one will have the pleasure of the yolk).
  3. Place each half into a baking tray into a preheated oven (180c) for 15-20 minutes.
  4. Once cooked, sprinkle with cheese, salt and pepper and place back into the oven for a further 2 minutes for the cheese to melt.

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  • Greek Yogurt with Berries

Your choice of berries from strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and so on. Add a spoonful of Greek yogurt for extra calcium and protein to start the day.

 

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  • Protein Banana Pancakes

This one is good if you’re bulking and love the added protein to your diet.

  1. Blend together 2 Bananas, 1 tbsp Greek Yogurt, 1 handful of Porridge Oats, 1 Egg and 1 spoonful of Protein Powder.
  2. Once blended add a pancake sized amount of mixture to a pan containing heated oil and cook on each side for around 1 minute.
  3. Carry on till all the mixture is used up!

 

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Spill The Beans #2: Food Tips From An MMU Student

Welcome to the second in our series of student food tips.

MetMUnch know it can be tricky to strike a good balance between your studies, money and feeding yourself what you need to shine.

The start of the academic year is an exciting and chaotic time, but it can also be the perfect chance to form new habits – which will hopefully leave you with a healthy body, brain and bank balance.

With this is mind, we decided to speak to some of nutrition’s future superstars to spill the beans on their food habits, tips and tricks! 

In this issue of Spill The Beans MetMUncher Sam Harrison spoke to third year Nutritional Sciences student, Cennet.

Hi, Cennet! What do you love about food?

Cennet – Hey! I love how food can bring social circles together. Whether its foodie lovers on social media or family get togethers. From a nutritionist standpoint – I love how food can heal our body and give us energy to enable us to achieve our best.
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