Spill The Beans #3: Food Tips From An MMU Student

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MetMUnch know it can be tricky to strike a good balance between your studies, money,  feeding yourself and what you need to shine.

The start of the academic year is an exciting and chaotic time, but it can also be the perfect chance to form new habits – which will hopefully leave you with a healthy body, brain and bank balance.

With this is mind, we decided to speak to some of nutrition’s future superstars to spill the beans on their food habits, tips and tricks!

In this issue of Spill The Beans MetMUncher Sam Harrison spoke to third year Nutritional Sciences student, Charlotte …

 

Hi,Charlotte! What do you love about food?

Charlotte Fisher

Hello. I love how it brings people together at occasions like Christmas and birthdays and how much you can brighten up someone’s day with cake!

 

How do you fuel yourself before a day at uni?

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I usually hit the gym before uni so it’s not uncommon for me to have two breakfasts! Oats, eggs, whey protein, yoghurt and bananas are all on the menu.

My favourite breakfast at the moment is proats (protein oats) made with oats, grated courgette (trust me, it adds loads of volume) and whey protein.

 

What’s your go to healthy snack when at uni?

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Probably apples, rice cakes, cottage cheese or roast chicken.

 

What WILL we find in your fridge?

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Loads of vegetables, cottage cheese, hummus, chicken, turkey, fish, Greek yoghurt and all of my meal prep for the next couple of days so baked sweet potatoes are usually there too. I will probably have hazelnut milk and beetroot in too which are my current obsessions

What WON’T we find in your fridge – and why?

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There aren’t many foods that I don’t like or won’t eat but I never have ready meals in the fridge. They’re really expensive and never taste that nice. I love dessert but I try not to keep any in the fridge too often because I know it’ll disappear all at once if I do!

 

What three food essentials can you never do without?

love-toast

My spiralizer for making courgette and carrot noodles, soup because you can literally make anything in to soup and it’ll taste good and artisan bread. You can dunk it in your soup, make it in to awesome sandwiches and who doesn’t love toast!

What is your best piece of advice for food shopping on a budget?

 fruits

Load up on seasonal veggies which are cheap and cheerful. Cabbage isn’t sexy but it’s usually pretty cheap and full of nutrients! Veggies are great for bulking out meals, as are staples like rice, pasta and potatoes. Cheaper cuts of meat like chicken thighs and braising steak can make great stews and will feed the whole house or can be frozen and provide several meals.

Get a job as a barista so that you rarely have to pay for good coffee.

We will be back soon with more inspiring tips from our fabulous food fanatics, where we’ll be asking them to spill the beans.

 

Want more foodie tips, tricks and nutritional advice? MetMUnch.com is full of recipes just for students. Find out more about our latest adventures in food at @MetMUnch on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

And that’s not all! Want a free recipe book of our favourite meals? Sign up to MetMUnch’s monthly mailing list and get a free eCookbook of student-friendly recipes.

Spill The Beans interviews by Sam Harrison.

 

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Spill The Beans #2: Food Tips From An MMU Student

Welcome to the second in our series of student food tips.

MetMUnch know it can be tricky to strike a good balance between your studies, money and feeding yourself what you need to shine.

The start of the academic year is an exciting and chaotic time, but it can also be the perfect chance to form new habits – which will hopefully leave you with a healthy body, brain and bank balance.

With this is mind, we decided to speak to some of nutrition’s future superstars to spill the beans on their food habits, tips and tricks! 

In this issue of Spill The Beans MetMUncher Sam Harrison spoke to third year Nutritional Sciences student, Cennet.

Hi, Cennet! What do you love about food?

Cennet – Hey! I love how food can bring social circles together. Whether its foodie lovers on social media or family get togethers. From a nutritionist standpoint – I love how food can heal our body and give us energy to enable us to achieve our best.
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Beans

Spill The Beans: 7 Food Tips From An MMU Student

MetMUnch know it can be tricky to strike a good balance between your studies, money and feeding yourself what you need to shine.

The start of the academic year is an exciting and chaotic time, but it can also be the perfect chance to form new habits – which will hopefully leave you with a healthy body, brain and bank balance.

With this is mind, we decided to speak to some of nutrition’s future superstars to spill the beans on their food habits, tips and tricks! 

In the first issue of Spill The Beans we speak to second year Nutritional Sciences student, Kate.

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Hi Kate! What do you love about food?

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Kate – Hi! I love how food can bring people together and can also be at the foot of a big debate. One of the best things about food is exploring the many different ingredients and seeing different cultures, recipes and how diverse meals can be.

 How do you fuel yourself before a day at uni?

I absolutely love Scottish oat porridge – I normally have skimmed milk and change up the toppings from banana to berries with a splash of agave nectar. I love the way you can change porridge to anything you like, it is never boring and also keeps me full until lunch time. Not only is it nutritious, but it also contains beta-glucans which help to lower cholesterol.

 What’s your go-to healthy snack when at uni?

I love Aldi’s ‘Foodie Market’ range, they have cheap and nutritious snacks that always keep me going between lectures. Their range consists of fruit and nut collections, a range of seed pots, healthy flapjacks and even baked crisp breads.

 What WILL we find in your fridge?

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You will always find free-range eggs in my fridge, they are so versatile and can be made into a lunchtime snack or a beautiful cake as I love to bake. High in protein and rich in vitamins and minerals, scrambled eggs on a wholemeal bread is my go-to after uni meal.

What WON’T we find in your fridge – and why?

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You definitely won’t find any ready-made meals within my fridge. I love cooking and always look forward to creating new delicious and exciting recipes.

 What three food essentials can you never do without?

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I could never go without mushrooms, I love the taste and always add them to dishes if I can. I also love tinned chickpeas – they are so versatile and scrumptious, making an excellent addition to curries and salads.

What is your best piece of advice for food shopping on a budget?

frozen, blackberries, raspberries, fruits, healthy, food, steam

When on a budget, frozen vegetables are a great way to get the essential nutrients without having to spend too much, they are often chopped too which is a bonus. Additionally, tinned fruits are great to get your 5-a-day when certain fruits are out of season, as fresh fruit is generally more expensive – but be careful of some in very sugary syrups!


There you have it, some wonderful tips and advice from a MetMUnch star! From cholesterol-lowering, versatile breakfasts to nutrient packed frozen veggies – thank you, Kate!

We’ll be back next week where we’ll ask another nutrition mastermind to Spill The Beans!

Want more foodie tips, tricks and nutritional advice? Find out more about our latest adventures in food at @MetMUnch on Twitter, Facebook, andInstagram.

And that’s not all! Want a free recipe book of our favourite meals? Sign up to MetMUnch’s monthly mailing list and get a free eCookbook of student-friendly recipes.

Spill The Beans interviews by Sam Harrison.

Kettlebell Kitchen: Restaurant Review

By Cennet Tezgel

A new restaurant claims to be Manchester’s first healthy fast food joint. But how does the food taste? MetMUncher Cennet went down to take a look.

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Exercise your tastebuds: Kettlebell Kitchen

Going to the gym and thinking about our food choices has become increasingly popular in the last few years, so it follows that there’s been a big demand for more protein restaurants to open in Manchester.

With a variety of restaurants catering for everything from vegan raw foods to junk food cafes and wine-and-dine restaurants, the new Kettlebell Kitchen – on Great Ancoats Street, on the edge of Manchester City Centre – fits in nicely with the city’s friendly, foodie ethos.

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6 Nutrition Tips To Get You Through Exams

By Sam Harrison

As the end of the academic year approaches, the thought of long summer days and catching up with friends may well be on your mind. For most of us, we must first tackle those long library days of revision and then finally…exams! Now, without a doubt this period can be stressful and a little draining, but MetMUnch are here to provide you with some simple nutritional nuggets of information to help you on your way.

1. Breakfast Is King (Or Queen)

Photo by Mille Vardheim / instagram.com/norwegianbrunch

Now admittedly, it’s a cliché but breakfast really is the most important meal of the day. Your body has been fasting for the hours you’ve been asleep and requires a hearty breakfast to kick-start all its intricate functions.

A satisfying meal of scrambled or poached eggs on whole wheat bread gives a brilliant dose of protein and slow releasing carbohydrates. Eggs also contain a vitamin called Choline, which has been linked to better cognitive performance and protecting against memory loss (especially pertinent when revising).

 

2. Eat For Energy

To better aid the long hours of revision, your body should be providing the brain with a steady supply of glucose. Through aerobic respiration, glucose is the key source of energy within the body, and your muscles and brain (with that, your concentration) need it to thrive.

Foods with a low glycemic index rating such as sweet potatoes, quinoa or oats, release glucose into the blood stream gradually. This will increase concentration levels for longer periods (sadly, we can’t say the same for nachos or cookies).

 

3. Water Your Brain

keep hydrated

Water allows a large proportion of the chemical reactions to take place in our bodies, so the speed at which our body and brain functions is directly inhibited when we become dehydrated.

As mentioned earlier, after a period of sleep, we need to replenish certain things the body needs to operate optimally, and this includes water. Checking the colour of your urine is a strong indicator of hydration levels. The darker it is, the more water you need to drink. The NHS recommends we aim to drink around 1.2 litres of fluid a day, preferably water.

 

4. Move Your Body

Take a break from the books and get some exercise. Even a 30 minute walk can do wonders by boosting your concentration levels whilst naturally elevating your mood.

 

5. Plan, Plan, Plan

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The key to maintaining a healthy body and mind when revising is preparation. A little forward planning goes a long way to negating the risk of reaching for poor food choices which may hamper your revision.

Ten minutes spent planning your meals before you go food shopping will be worth it on results day!

 

6. Treat yourself!

Perhaps most importantly – set aside some time to enjoy your favourite foods or drinks in a guilt-free way. This will not only help to keep you motivated, but gives you something to look forward to at the end of a long week. I personally find the idea of pizza and cocktails especially motivating 🙂

Best of luck, everyone!

MMU Women In Focus

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To celebrate International Women’s Day on the 8th March, MetMunch have teamed up with MMU Engage and asked some of the most inspirational women at Manchester Met to participate in our Women In Focus project.

The name has been chosen to tie in with the World Food Programme’s Focus On Women initiative, which looks at how food issues and shortages affect women globally: http://www.wfp.org/focus-on-women

We asked each participant for their favourite recipe and will hold a vote on @MetMUnch on 7th March to find out which is your favourite. All recipes will be hosted here on MetMUnch.com, and you can share your own recipes and photos with us using the hashtag #MMUWomenInFocus

Check out our MMU Women In Focus recipes here.

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Blueberry Oat Pancake Recipe

Christmas is coming and we know that tends to mean the closest some of us will get to fruit is a chocolate orange. But it doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy some healthy, nutritious food.

We’ve selected our blueberry oat pancake recipe especially for your Christmas breakfast. Packed with protein, they’re perfect to give you the energy you need to get from opening presents all the way through to the Eastenders special. 

 

Blueberry Oat Pancakes

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 160g rolled oats
  • 250g cottage cheese
  • 300g Greek/natural yoghurt
  • 250g blueberries
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 4 tsp. honey
  • Rapeseed oil to lightly coat

 

How To:

  1. Put the oats, cottage cheese, eggs and vanilla in a large mixing bowl and beat gently to form a smooth batter.
  2. Use a large metal spoon to fold the blueberries into the batter – careful not to break them!
  3. Lightly coat a non-stick frying pan with oil and heat over a medium heat until just smoking.
  4. Pour one tablespoon of the batter into the pan to make a pancake and repeat, spacing the pancakes apart.
  5. Cook for 2-3 minutes on each side until the tops bubble and the edges start to brown.
  6. Remove first pancake from the pan and stack on plate.
  7. Top with a tablespoon of Greek yoghurt and stack second pancake on top.
  8. Repeat layers until you have stacked four pancakes.
  9. Drizzle the pancakes with honey.

 

Notes:

  • If you’d like a seasonal alternative to blueberries, remove them from your recipe and try slicing pears or an apple to add on the side of your pancakes.
  • Want to up the protein in your diet? Add a scoop of protein powder to the mixture.
  • You can also mix the batter in a blender if you have one.
Vegetable Soup

Soup Surprise with MMU Environment

We wandered into the MetMUnch kitchen this lunchtime and who did we bump into but the Manchester Met Environment Team’s very own Ailsa!

Ailsa was warming an absolutely sumptuous soup – we asked what was in it and she reeled off a list of delicious vegetables (including a munchkin, our personal favourite). What’s more, all 11 ingredients cost just 35p!! That’s just over 3p per item!

We had to get the recipe for the soup, and Ailsa kindly shared it with us. Check it out below and enjoy a hearty, cheap, and sustainable soup this weekend.

value vegetable soup by ailsa McConnachie–Folwell

Going to reduced sections in supermarkets is one of my favourite things to do. Sounds crazy, but it’s like going on an adventure – you never know what is going to be there. It’s always a surprise, and when you bag a bargain, you feel great! As a result of buying reduced goods, I’ve become a lot more creative with my cooking, as well as saving a lot of money.

A few days ago, I went into my local Sainsbury’s to find a pile of vegetables were reduced. I bought 3 carrots, a swede, an onion, a parsnip, a munchkin (mini pumpkin) and some tomatoes for only 35p. There was one thing to do with it –  make a hearty, warming, healthy, winter soup.

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Ingredients:

  • 3 carrots
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 onion
  • 1 swede
  • 1 munchkin
  • 1 large potato
  • 4 tomatoes
  • Tablespoon of mustard (I used wholegrain but any will do!)
  • 1 stock cube
  • Enough water to cover all the veg once they’re in the pan
  • 1 teaspoon oil (I used rapeseed, but any will do)

Method:

  1. Dice your onion and add to a large pan, on a medium-high heat, with the teaspoon of oil. Let the onion cook for 3 or 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Meanwhile, chop the carrot, swede, parsnip, potato, tomatoes and munchkin into chunks, roughly 1 inch. (I don’t peel my veg, I just scrub it under water) Add to the pan with the onion and give it a good stir for a minute or so.
  3. Add water to the pan – enough to just cover the vegetables. Add the stock cube and tablespoon of mustard and stir.
  4. Let the water come to a boil, then reduce the heat so the veg are simmering.
  5. After about 10 minutes, poke the veg with a knife to see if they are cooked. If they aren’t, let them simmer for 3-4 minutes longer.
  6. When everything is cooked, take off the heat. Blend the soup using a blender (or leave chunky).
  7. Season as desired and serve with crusty bread. Enjoy!

Notes:

  • Any vegetables can be turned into soup – I even put lettuce leaves in a soup once!
  • Peeling vegetables removes all the nutrients that are under the skin. I say leave the skins on!
  • Mustard goes really well with vegetables – it gives them a fuller flavour and adds depth to dishes like soups, stews and bakes.

 

MoSI Cravings

MetMUnch’s Big Week of Staff & Student Impact

THE LAST week of October was an intense one for MetMUnch, with six events held in six science-packed days.

SciBarThe week began on Monday with a talk at the Department of Science and Engineering’s SciBar, held at The Lass O’Gowrie pub. MetMUnch founder Haleh Moravej delivered an exciting and interactive session, Fat Is Not The Enemy, about good fats versus bad fats, with props including five pounds of fat wowing 60 staff and students from across the University.

On Tuesday, MetMUnch and MMU Sport continued their collaboration in the second HealthyU nutrition class. HealthyU is an eight-week nutrition and fitness programme launched in October. Currently in its pilot stage, the aim is for staff and student participants to enhance their knowledge and understanding of nutrition and fitness, with twice weekly workouts complimented by nutrition classes.

MetMUnch is planning on designing and delivering more creative, bespoke nutrition, health and wellness sessions for teams and departments across Manchester Met, as well as working
on a bigger and better HealthyU programme with MMU Sport for 2016.

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Kimchi cravings

Wednesday saw the Cravings: Late event at the Museum of Science and Industry. Staff and students worked from 7pm to 11pm, educating over 900 members of the public in how to create kimchi, a popular fermented Korean condiment. In the first half hour alone, MetMUnchers demonstrated, created and gave away 250 jars to the eager public, all while explaining the health benefits of and microbiology behind fermented foods.
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MoSI Creative Director Carol Keating said: “I wanted to thank you for all your help making Cravings: Late such a success! We had a record-breaking 909 visitors in the end – double the number we usually see for late events – and we’ve had some great feedback from guests on what a fantastic night it was.” The event showed the level of creativity, fun and excitement that is only possible when students are truly engaged, empowered and learning while doing.

microbesOn Thursday, MetMUnch took part in A Menu Made by Microbes, in collaboration with Professor Jo Verran and celebrity chef Richard Fox. Haleh Moravej hosted a table at Harvey Nichols, where she shared her knowledge of fermentation and nutritional science with diners at the event. MetMUnch will be collaborating on all future Menu Made by Microbes events, increasing cross-departmental engagement for staff and students and continuing to deliver groundbreaking public events on behalf of Manchester Met.
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Friday saw the team work with MMU Futures, MMU Environment, MMU Sport and Residential Life at the MMU Futures Halloween Social. MetMUnchers advised their fellow students on how to use winter vegetables, gave away free pumpkin recipes, and used the hashtag #KitchenHorrorStories to capture video interviews with students on the barriers to fresh cooking and healthy eating as a student.

 

Halloween extravaganza

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MetMUnch’s big week concluded on Halloween, as the team joined staff and students from the Faculty of Science and Engineering in John Dalton for the Manchester Science Festival Science Extravaganza. MetMUnch’s cardboard kitchen was transformed into Dracula’s Creepy Carbon Kitchen, and students helped children investigate ways to cut Dracula’s carbon footprint by reducing his energy use in the home. MetMUnch also gave away augmented reality recipes and special MiniMUnchers activity booklets to children and their parents.

Lecturer in Science Communication Dr Sam Illingworth said: “A massive thank you to you and your team for helping to make Science Extravaganza so special. We had 253 visitors and every one of them loved it.”SciEx 2

The above follows a range of events held by MetMUnch around Manchester Met this academic year, including the opening of a one-day-only pop-up Apple Store (with real apples instead of iPhones), cooking 700 portions of free curry and soup for Birley Community Day, and holding interactive cooking, budget and nutrition lessons for students, including introducing kitchen basics to 3,000 new students on Welcome Sunday.

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