The MetMUnch Vegan Foodie 3 By Nikita Star

Manchester Burgers #1

Everyone loves a burger with fries, right? You don’t have to go to a fully vegan establishment to find a meat-free one, most eateries in Manchester have one on the menu, or at least one you can ask to be made vegan by excluding the mayo or cheese.

I plan to eat more vegan burgers in Manchester, but for now, here’s four to look out for…

Handmade Burger Co. – Deansgate, M3 3WB

Nikita Burger 1

Handmade Burger Co. Thai Vegetable Burger (£8.25)

This place offers so much variety. Not only do they have a vast selection of meat burgers for those not ready for the plants, they have six veggie vegan-friendly burgers to choose from, along with additional sides, salads and milkshakes. I went with meat eaters who ordered chicken and beef burgers, but when mine came out they commented how good it looked and one wished she had opted for a veggie one.

I had the Thai Vegetable burger: Thai vegetable patty, grilled peppers, sweet chilli sauce, red onion and watercress. It was full of sweet and savoury flavours and was hearty and filling. I would happily eat this burger again, but not before I try their other five!


BrewDog – Peter Street, M2 5BG

Nikita Burger 2 copy

BrewDog Hail Seitan Burger (£9) + sweet potato fries (£2.50)

Oh my! This is the only time I have ever had seitan. I do not know if all seitan tastes this good or whether BrewDog just cooked it to perfection. Seitan is made from the wheat protein gluten, sounds gross I know, which is why I had never bothered trying it before. Named “Hail Seitan”, this burger is described as a BBQ seitan steak with crispy kale, sun kissed tomato chutney and hummus.

The taste and texture literally reminded me of sticky BBQ spare ribs from a Chinese takeaway; meaty, a little chewy, sticky and sweet. I was very pleasantly surprised and thoroughly enjoyed it, 10/10. BrewDog is not a vegan eatery but has a few options, including another burger, a hot dog, buffalo cauliflower wings, salad and sides.


Fuel Café – Wilmslow Road, M20 3BW

Nikita Burger 3 copy

Falafel Burger with salad (£6.20) + sweet potato wedges (£3)

If you’re a student living close to fallowfeild, Fuel is just down the road heading towards Withington. It has that student, quirky hippy vibe to it. Very friendly and soulful atmosphere with lots of colour, cosiness and hosts open mic nights and live music. The menu caters hearty vegetarian food with vegan options, including breakfasts, mains, cakes, milkshakes and booze. I had the falafel burger, made vegan, and it was as tasty as falafel burgers get, with a dollop of hummus for a great price. The side of sweet potato wedges bumped up the bill, but they were worth it.

I also treated myself to a piece of chocolate cake, which was super decedent and would satisfy anyone’s chocolate cravings. A satisfying meal within a great setting, you would come back just for the atmosphere itself.


Nando’s – Multiple locations

Nikita Burger 4

Nando’s Supergreen Burger (£6.25) total + two sides (£10.45)

I loved the soya veggie burger on the old Nando’s menu, but just recently, they ditched it and replaced it with two new burgers: Sweet Potato & Butternut and Supergreen.
With Nando’s veggie burgers you must request no mayo for them to be vegan and they can be ordered either on a bun, pitta or wrap. Now, I was optimistic as I enjoyed their old one. I was disappointed.

The taste, I cannot fault. However, this cannot be classed as a burger. It did not hold together in the slightest, it was completely soft and mushy, resembling more of a sandwich filler paste. I would eat it again for sure; it was delicious and complemented the sun-dried tomatoes. Nevertheless, it is not a burger.

Keep an eye out for more reviews coming up on MetMUnch and get in touch with us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram to let us know what you think! 


The MetMUnch Vegan Foodie 2 by Nikita Star

Festivals & Fairs!

Before I begin introducing Manchester restaurants, let me start with a quick intro to vegan foodie festivals and fairs! These are happening more and more regularly within the Manchester food scene. Search for them on social media to keep up to date and make sure to go hungry and prepare to be stuffed with a range of taste-tastic creations. Vegan or carnivore, you will not be disappointed.


VON (Vegan Organic Network) Festivals and Fairs

Von is a UK registered charity aiming to promote and support organic vegan agriculture.

These snaps were taken from their event in November 2017. VON is great for vegan feasting and hold multiple events throughout the year. Look forward to free mini samples on offer and sometimes a goodie bag on entry.

As well as incredible food, there are clothing and beauty stalls, live music, and various talks and workshops. For future events, check out their Facebook page:

Honestly, you would never believe the cakes below were vegan.

Nikita Cakes



GRUB – Plant Powered Sundays

Fairfield Social Club, Archway 6, Temperance Street,  M12 6HR

Ok, so this becoming so popular and I can’t wait to go back. I can see this place being my new favourite spot for vegan grub. GRUB is a street food events company and holds events every weekend, but Sundays are dedicated to the plant eaters. They have 4 or 5 street food stalls, and they are exceptional and change weekly.

The setting has a hipster vibe full of soul, fairy lights and music. There’s a bar serving vegan alcohol and it’s the place to be on a Sunday. Follow them on twitter as they’re always doing competitions for free food and drinks at their events. Though they’re open all day and try to stack enough grub, get there early, you don’t want to risk missing out.

Nikita Chippy

I was lucky enough to attend when “The Hip Hop Chip Shop” were there (see above). Oh my, a vegan chippy. It was FAB. Very impressed with their battered soy shrimp and the chunky chips were the best chippy chips I’ve ever had, for real.

I had treats from ChouChoux, and Bake-O-Rama’s cupcakes were superb. All washed down with a refreshing pint of vegan cider.

Let’s face it, Sundays are a day of rest, so rather than cook yourself, go and enjoy the best vegan street grub Manchester has to offer.

Nikita Cakes 2




Northern Vegan Festival.
When: Saturday 7th April, 10:30am – 5pm

Where: Manchester central, Windmill Street, M2 3GX

I love this one. I missed last year but I did go the previous year. I find it similar to the VON festival. Its big and rammed with food, beauty and clothes stalls. There’s workshops, demos, talks, live music and sometimes speed dating! At the end of the day it spills over to a night of socialising at The Thirsty Scholar- a lively pub down the road from Man Met Uni, serving vegan alcohol. The event is volunteer run and all ticket money goes to animal welfare charities.

Vegan Life Live

When: Friday 20th April – Sunday 22nd April
Where: Event City, M14 7TB

This is a new 3-day event brought to us by Vegan Life Magazine. A bus ride away for us Manchester students, its located in Trafford. It sounds as though it will be worth the journey, promising delicious food and drink, clothing, cosmetics and education.

Get in touch with us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and let us know what you think! 


The MetMUnch Vegan Foodie By Nikita Star

Being Vegan in Manchester

I’m Nikita and I’m a second year Nutritional Sciences student at Manchester Met. Yes, my love for food is so real, that I’m studying it!

Since being a baby, my mum tells me stories of my excessive sweet tooth, and not much has changed, well except I transitioned to a vegan diet in 2013. To be honest, this only grew my passion for food. At the time, veganism was no way near as big as it is now and so it forced me to learn how to cook. Fast forward a few years and eating out or ordering a vegan takeaway has never been easier.

The vegan movement continuous to grow and Britain alone has seen a 360% increase in Vegans over the last 10 years (Quinn, 2016), with figures of over half a million Brits being vegan (The Vegan Society, n.d.). Furthermore, in 2017, statistics revealed 28% of Brits reduced their meat intake within 6 months and 49% are interested in doing so (Mintel, 2017) for ethical and health reasons. Meat alternatives are on the incline with 50% of Brits purchasing meat-free products (Mintel, 2017) and this year a whopping 168,500 people signed up for the Veganuary pledge for reasons including animal welfare, health and the environment (Veganuary, 2018).
Vegan Nikita

Figure 1: Veganuary (2018) Statistics

Manchester is the place to be for vegan grub, with more vegan options appearing on menus and new vegan restaurants popping up all over the city. This isn’t surprising, Manchester has always been ahead of the game being the birthplace of the Vegetarian Society.

So, I dedicate this blog series to all the delicious vegan food Manchester has to offer. I would like to point out some of my photos are of mediocre quality; I had no idea I would end up sharing my food adventures. If you’re new to Manchester, new to Veganism, or just want to increase your palette, stay tuned to find out where is good to get Manchester vegan grub.


Mintel (2017) 28% of Brits have cut back their meat consumption over the last six months. Mintel. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018]

Quinn, S. (2016) Number of vegans in Britain rises by 360% in 10 years. The Telegraph. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018]

The Vegan Society (n.d.) Key facts. The Vegan Society. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018]

Veganuary (2018) A Record-Breaking Veganuary 2018. [Online] [Accessed on 22 February 2018]

This Is How We Stew It – Lindsay Seccombe

There I stand staring into my cupboards, dreaming of having some money so that could eat out tonight when I think to myself, you’re a nutrition student, you’re supposed to cook tasty, healthy meals.

Now what can I make!? I look to my right and there I see my trusty companion, my slow cooker.

If you don’t have a slow cooker already, then I advise you to buy one. As a university student cooking for yourself, you will only need a small 1.5 litre one for as little as £7! – Absolutely Stewpendous (I seriously love puns…)

I enjoy cooking many meals in my slow cooker, as I can throw all my ingredients into the pot and carry on with my day rather than standing over a hot stove. Because to be honest… I don’t have time for that!

This recipe can be altered in spiciness depending on how daring your taste buds are, personally I prefer mine fairly mild. I suppose this recipe is a mix between a curry and a stew, due to the spice involved.

So here we go…

Ingredients (Serves 2 – Costs £0.44p per serving) – wow!

  • 1 Tin Chopped Tomatoes
  • 1 Tin Mixed Beans in Chilli Sauce
  • 1 tsp Medium Curry Powder
  • 1 tsp Mixed Herbs
  • 50g Lentils

(Optional extras include – peppers, onions, chickpeas or whatever else needs using up in your cupboards) – which would change the cost slightly.

So, as I said earlier, there isn’t much method involved as all ingredients can be added straight to the slow cooker except for the lentils.

The lentils need to be added to 250ml water and cooked in a pan on the hob for 25 minutes before being added to the slow cooker. Leave the slow cooker to do its job on a ‘high’ heat setting for 4 hours, stirring occasionally.

The stew can be served on its own or with a hefty scoop of rice or potatoes!

Serve and ENJOY!

Check out MetMUnch for more savvy student tips over at, on Instagram and Twitter at @metmunch.

Yogurt please! That’ll be four teaspoons of sugar…

As the modern world discusses the benefits of Meat free Monday (of which there are many), and the fight against obesity seeming to be solely focussing on the sugar in soft drinks, one very dangerous oversight is being made by the public in the mission to be more healthy…yogurts!

Yogurts you ask? But they are part of my healthy breakfast you say.

In some cases you will be correct, however little do you know that the delicious ‘healthy’ yogurt you have in the morning could have as much sugar in as the chocolate bar you wouldn’t even consider for breakfast!

Don’t get me wrong; ‘un-sweetened’ yogurts make an extremely healthy snack. They are overflowing with calcium, protein and vitamins. If you choose a natural yogurt then the benefits are vast. The lactic bacteria in yoghurt can boost the immune system, lower body fat; protect against food poisoning and build stronger bones. Furthermore, We at MetMUnch can’t claim that all sugars in yogurts are bad, however, scratch beneath the surface of some of your favourite brands and you’ll find similar levels to junk food lurking in that tub.


One problem lies with the fact that brands don’t differentiate between naturally occurring sugars and those that have been added, merely marking it ‘carbohydrates – of which sugars’. This is a sneaky way of deceiving the customer into not knowing exactly what they are consuming.

Not too surprising is the fact that the Muller Corner range can contain 90% of a child’s daily allowance of sugar. That’s over four and a half teaspoons in one 100g serving!!

The biggest shock though will come from two that you might have considered to be healthy; Onken Greek style apple and cinnamon yogurt and the Yeo Valley 0% fat vanilla yogurt.

Let’s start with Onken. Greek yogurt gets an amazing write up and the health benefits can be great, the deception here lies in its name though, it’s a ‘Greek style yogurt’, which enables Onken to add four teaspoons of sugar to it. Crazy right?!

Now for the one people would consider being healthiest…Yeo Valley and its 0% fat vanilla yogurt, surely 0% fat means it’s healthy? Nope! They’ve still managed to cram in 15.5g of sugar into a 100g serving, which is just a bit less than four teaspoons.


Some of the main reasons for this are that, although dairy prices have been falling, sugar is still the cheaper alternative to bulk up that pot. That combined with the fact that natural yogurt tastes quite sour, means that the sugar makes tastier, and more addictive and generally more fun for the sugar beasts we have become in the last few decades.

The UK government is at least making some headway into this issue, with its Childhood Obesity Plan tasking the sector to reduce sugar by 20% by 2020. However, it is public opinion on yogurt that needs to change to have a bigger impact.

Obviously, it will still come down to have a healthy balanced lifestyle, but more care needs to be taken with all processed food. Take the time to read the label to see what you’re actually eating. Alternatively, why not make yourself some overnight oats to give yourself the brain food that you need, as well as keeping you fuller for longer.

For recipe ideas or for more tips, visit  or see our social media feeds on Twitter and Instagram at @metmunch.

Go Bananas! Make a cake – Rachel Davies

Go Bananas!

I don’t know about you, but I only like bananas that are completely yellow – any black or brown and there’s no way I will eat them. BUT! I never ever throw them away!


My go to bake for left over bananas is obviously banana cake!

Here’s the recipe:

130g butter or margarine. (if you don’t line the tin with a loaf case or greaseproof paper, you’ll need a little extra to line the tin)

140g caster sugar

2 large eggs

140g Self Raising Flour

5g baking powder

2 Bananas

  1. Mix the butter and the sugar
  2. Beat the eggs and mix in
  3. Mix in the flour and baking powder
  4. Mash the bananas and mix in (you can also blend the bananas for a smoother texture)
  5. Line the loaf tin with either a greaseproof case or butter
  6. Pour the mixture into the tin
  7. Bake for 30 minutes at 180C, check that a knife or skewer comes out clean, if not give it a little longer in the oven.
  8. Serve and enjoy!


Here is where you can get creative!

  • Add 50g chopped nuts such as walnuts to the cake mixture
  • Decorate with a toffee icing or add toffee chunks to the mixture for a Banoffee twist
  • Serve with custard for a bananas and custard flavour
  • Add 40g cocoa powder or 60g dark chocolate chips to the mixture for a banana and chocolate cake!
  • Take out of the oven about 10 minutes early and sprinkle banana chips over the top, put back in the oven until cooked.

Had a go? Let us know: Twitter @MetMUnch or Instagram @metmunch

Gluten: Friend or Foe? – by Molly Hanson

The gluten-free diet: Possibly the biggest diet trend of the 21st century, there are copious amounts of gluten free products available to purchase these days making it accessible to all. For those that cannot tolerate gluten, this accessibility means that their social life and eating habits are less impeded than ever before and preparation for a meal out is rarely necessary.

But is going gluten free beneficial for everyone?

When the gluten-free diet is necessary:

Gluten, which is a storage protein found in wheat, barley and rye, can have a dangerous effect on certain individuals.


For those with coeliac disease as little bit of gluten can have irreversible effects. The consumption of gluten triggers an immune response which damages the lining of the small intestine causing the microvilli (finger-like projections) to be damaged and become flat, which inhibits absorption of nutrients, and can result in malabsorption.

This response causes the symptoms associated with Coeliac Disease such as excessive wind, change in stool frequency and consistency, stomach pain and bloating. In serious un-treated cases coeliacs can develop villious atrophy where the microvilli totally disappear. These symptoms increase the risk for other health conditions such as anaemia and osteoporosis due to insufficient Iron and/or Calcium absorption. In this case a strict gluten-free diet is necessary and will improve the health of the individual dramatically.

There is also a condition that causes similar symptoms; non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. However, the consumption of gluten does not result in an auto-immune response and there is no intestinal damage. Having said that the symptoms can be as painful and debilitating as those with coeliac disease suffer and a gluten free diet can also be necessary to improve health.

When the gluten-free diet is used incorrectly:

Following the gluten free diet with no gluten related health condition? Perhaps a friend suggested going gluten free because ‘it’s better for you’, or perhaps you read an article online or in the newspaper based on anecdotal reports, suggesting that the gluten free diet can help you to; lose weight, boost energy, treat autism or generally feel healthier.

pointing-finger-1922074_1280Following the diet erroneously can result in more harm than good. A recent study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) suggested that the omission of gluten may result in reduced consumption of a variety of beneficial wholegrains, which may affect cardiovascular health. In conclusion the promotion of a gluten-free diet among people without coeliac disease (or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity) should not be encouraged.

If you think you are suffering with either of the two conditions above, do not cut gluten out of your diet without Medical advice and make an appointment with your GP as soon as possible.

For more advice, visit Coeliac UK at

How to bake a simple cake – Rachel Davies

Sliced Caked Sponge Cake Baked CakeIf I had a pound for every time I heard someone say, “I can’t bake” – I’d be rich!

But home-baking doesn’t have to be like the Great British Bake Off – remember you’re not baking to impress Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry (or Prue Leith now its moved to Channel 4!) – just bake for yourself and your friends, but make sure you’re going to do something you’ll enjoy as it will make the task even easier.

Recently, there has been a trend for Microwave cakes, which have been advertised as a ‘really easy cake’ that you can make in minutes (there’s some great ideas for recipes here, for when you don’t have a lot of time to bake). But to be honest with you, they don’t even taste half as nice as a normal oven baked cake.

So here is a simple cake recipe:


125g margarine or butter Margarine is much softer, so is good if you’re mixing the cake by hand, Butter would need to be left out of the fridge a while before you start so that it can soften

125g Caster Sugar You can use Granulated Sugar, but the cake gets a grainier texture

2 large eggs

125g self raising flour It’s best to use self raising flour – if you only use plain flour you’ll end up with a flat cake! If you only have plain flour, you need to add a teaspoon of baking powder and a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda to the mixture.

Yes, really that’s all you need!


Heat the oven to 150C.

  1. Grease a baking tin with either the margarine or butter, whichever you have chosen to use.
  2. In a mixing bowl, mix the margarine/butter with the caster sugar
  3. Mix in the eggs
  4. Either, sieve the flour into the bowl and mix or, if you don’t have a sieve, add the flour a little at a time and mix in between each addition.
  5. Spoon the cake mixture into the tin
  6. Bake in the oven for 30-40 minutes. (When cooked, the cake should be a golden brown colour on top and if you insert a knife of skewer into the middle of the cake, then it will come out clean.)
  7. Leave to cool.

Want to decorate the cake?


100g Butter or Margarine

200g Icing Sugar

  1. Mix together the two ingredients and spread over the cake once it has cooled


200g icing sugar

2 tablespoons water

  1. Mix the icing sugar and water and spread over the cake

Feeling Adventurous?

You could add flavours to the decoration, such as vanilla essence, orange essence or lemon essence, or add some orange or lemon zest using a grater and then squeeze the juice into the mixture.

Let us know if you have a go at baking! Send us a picture to @MetMUnch on Twitter or Instagram!




MUM vs MMU – Emma Green

Big Changes to food and dietary habits

There’s many big changes that come into play when starting university: living in a different city, new groups of friends, but one change we don’t really think about is our food and dietary habits. And surprisingly, it can have a HUGE effect on our student lives.

My Mum, as most Mum’s do, played a huge part in encouraging my love of food whilst growing up. She taught me how to cook from a young age and introduced me to different world cuisines, as well as providing me with the facilities to learn to cook in. I’m very fortunate to have been given these skills as a tot, but I know many students cannot cook or simply, find cooking a chore.

Losing the help of Mum when you’re at University can lead to malnutrition, through poor dietary habits and a lack of nutrients. In 2016, a study found that 1/3 couldn’t even boil an egg, with 48% being unable to put together a simply spaghetti Bolognese.

Putting together a simple meal is super easy!!

There are many student friendly recipe books, YouTube tutorials and even on-the-go apps to teach you some tips (and some here at MetMUnch, of course 😃).

I grew up very much in a meat and two veg family, which I often found laborious and repetitive. Independence with my food choice allowed me to find my own rhythm with my food preferences. Since starting at Manchester Met, I make sure I go meat free at least 2 or 3 days a week. Increasing your veggie uptake can not only be great for your health, but is a sustainable way of living.

Live Sustainably

Living sustainably is probably something you hadn’t even considered since becoming a student,  and not surprisingly, students are the worst at it. With over buying, over cooking and serial snacking, we throw away a huge seven billion tonnes of food away each year, much of which can be eaten.

For students, wasting food is also a huge waste of money, but by following a few simple tips, you could save a lot of pennies in your pockets.

Remember, the freezer is your friend, where keeping fresh fruit and veg, alongside meat, bread and leftover meals will reduce any waste without compromising on taste and nutrient contents (be sure NOT to reheat cooked meat though, keep that in the fridge to eat cold). Communal cooks are also great if you have some friends who want to share some meals and split up the cooking tasks (and the washing up).

As a nutrition student, I thought that I would have cooking healthy for one MASTERED, but surprisingly, my diet took a big hit. I gained independence with my choice of foods and allowed myself to try new foods, but this was also as bad as it was good. The availability of fast food was hard to resist, and slowly tempted me in after nights out, for lazy lunches and when I run out of food and simply could not be bothered to shop.

It made me CRAVE the home cooking and nutrient rich roasts made by my Mum. I’ve slowly learnt to curb these cravings and health up my habits (but no, I still haven’t mastered the singular measure of pasta either).

To help me get back from takeaway binges, I now check out MetMUnch for some savvy student tips over on Instagram and Twitter, you should too!

Fun, food and fresher’s flu – Sam Harrison

Hello Freshers! (and returning students!) This is it!

The start of the academic year, with nothing but fun, friends and hangovers in front of you (plus, hopefully a few lectures). Chances are, before you arrived you gave the following (admittedly, extremely important) things some serious consideration:

  • The colour scheme and theme of your new bedroom (I personally recommend just scattering a few cushions around the place). *I’d advise against asking your parents to do multiple trips in a car full of candlestick holders, trinkets and ornaments (I definitely didn’t do this. Not at all. Nope. No. Ok, maybe)

  • Some new outfits (studies suggest looking stylish at 9am lectures helps retain additional information (MrIMadeThisUp, 2017)).
  • If you’re going to get along with your course mates and flatmates (I’m pretty sure you will!)

But how much consideration have you given to your food, your health and the prospect of being the best, healthiest you possible?

We all neglect aspects of healthy eating from time to time, and MetMUnch certainly won’t advise against going out with your new friends, drinking, dancing and having the time of your life! – The social aspect of university life is incredibly important!

That being said, here are a few tips to balance out all the booze and late nights, so you can reach your full potential in the coming weeks and months, keep your bank balance healthy and keep freshers flu at bay;

  • Drink water, even on a night out! – Alcoholic drink, water, alcoholic drink, water. Your head and your bank balance will thank you for it in the morning. Booze not only dehydrates you, but tends to be high in calories and lacking in nutrients. By drinking water every other drink, you’ll rehydrate your body and save some calories for the following mornings yummy breakfast (we all need an amazing breakfast after a night of drinking, right?). For more tips on avoiding horrendous hangovers, please read this great blog by lovely Emma

  • Speaking of breakfast – eat breakfast! Everyday, especially on university days. Your body has been fasting over night and needs to replenish its stores to allow you to thrive and stay alert. Early morning lectures can be tricky enough without falling asleep and hitting your head on the desk in front of you. MetMUnch recommends oats, oats and more oats! So versatile, so filling and so nutritious. Add fruit, nuts or seeds. Why not add a few squares of dark chocolate in there? This breakfast will give you slow releasing carbohydrates to power you through until lunchtime.
  • Make use of the uni cafes – Manchester Met do some great, affordable salad bars and soups!
  • Plan ahead – This ultimately saves time and money (things we tend to take for granted when living with our parents). Make a shopping list, stick to it and cook your meals in advance. What could be better than a yummy, nutritious meal waiting for after a long day at uni? This also reduces the risk of feasting on junk and takeaway food. We also recommend visiting supermarkets in the evening, as this is when they tend to reduce the prices on various foods and you’re bound to bag a bargain. So many healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, can be frozen, which locks in vitamins and minerals and allows you to eat them at your leisure.

  • Try not to get caught up in food fads and “superfoods”. The majority of the foods we know to be good for us have always been good for us, and will continue to be good for us. Make sensible choices – swap the white bread for brown bread and the Frosties for muesli (you get the idea).

There you have it – a few simple tips to help you through your first weeks and months of the university year. Squeeze every last bit of fun out of your time at uni and be good to yourself; you’ve worked hard to get here and you deserve to thrive.